• Load image into Gallery viewer, Myo-Inositol & D-Chiro Inositol + MTHF Folate + Vitamin D3
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Myo-Inositol & D-Chiro Inositol + MTHF Folate + Vitamin D3
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Myo-Inositol & D-Chiro Inositol + MTHF Folate + Vitamin D3
Myo-Inositol & D-Chiro Inositol + MTHF Folate + Vitamin D3
Myo-Inositol & D-Chiro Inositol + MTHF Folate + Vitamin D3
Myo-Inositol & D-Chiro Inositol + MTHF Folate + Vitamin D3

Myo-Inositol & D-Chiro Inositol + MTHF Folate + Vitamin D3

120 Vegetarian Capsules 

Nourish your ovarian health with added methylfolate (MTHF) and Vitamin D3 on top of our perfect 40:1 ratio of Myo & D-Chiro Inositol blend.

90-day money-back guarantee

If you don’t see the desired results in 90 days, we promise you a full refund. No questions asked.

Regulate and rebalance your hormones with an added boost of nutrients
BENEFITS
SUGGESTED USE
CAUTION
Research

Improves metabolic profiles

If you have PCOS, your insulin levels tend to be imbalanced. Myo & D-Chiro Inositol can help improve insulin sensitivity to lower lipid and glucose levels, inflammation, blood pressure and risk for developing Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Balances hormone levels

With the supplement’s positive effect on insulin resistance, your hormone levels can find its healthy balance again and you may see alleviated symptoms of PCOS such as unwanted facial hair, acne, and irregular periods.

Lowers homocysteine levels

PCOS women tend to have higher homocysteine levels which impacts insulin resistance and increases risk of cardiovascular diseases. MTHF regulates your homocysteine levels, especially beneficial if you have the MTHFR gene mutation.

Suggested Use:

For adults, take 4 capsules daily, preferably with a meal, or as directed by a physician. For those with a sensitive constitution, take 2 capsules twice daily.

Caution: 

Do not exceed recommended dose. Pregnant and nursing mothers, children under the age of 18, and individuals with a known medical condition or taking prescription medication should consult a physician before taking this or any dietary supplement.

[1] Williams, T., Mortada, R., & Porter, S. (2016). Diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome. American Family Physician, 94(2), 106-113. Retrieved from: https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0715/p106.html#sec-5

[2] Benelli, E., Del Ghianda, S., Di Cosmo, C., & Tonacchera, M. (2016). A combined therapy with myo-inositol and d-chiro-inositol improves endocrine parameters and insulin resistance in PCOS young overweight women. International Journal of Endocrinology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3204083

[3] Sortino, M. A., Salomone, S., Carruba, M. O., & Drago, F. (2017). Polycystic ovary syndrome: insights into the therapeutic approach with inositols. Journal Frontiers in Pharmacology, 8(341), 1-13. DOI: 10.3389/fphar.2017.00341

[4] Troisi, J., Cinque, C., Giugliano, L., Symes, S., Richards, S., Adair, D., Cavallo, P., Sarno, L., Scala, G., Caiazza, M., & Guida, M. (2019). Metabolomic change due to combined treatment with myo-inositol, d-chiro-inositol and glucomannan in polycystic ovarian syndrome patients: a pilot study. Journal of Ovarian Research, 12(25). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13048-019-0500-x 

[5] Kalra, B., Kalra, S., & Sharma, J. (2016). The inositols and polycystic ovary syndrome. Indian Journal of Ednocrinology and Metabolism, 20(5), 720-724. DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.189231 

[6] Unfer, V., Facchinetti, F., Orru, B., Giordani, B., & Nestler, J. (2017). Myo-inositol effects in women with PCOS: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Endocrine Connections, 6(8), 647-658. DOI: 10.1530/EC-17-0243 

[7] Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. (2018, April 11). Folic acid. https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/folicacid/faqs/faqs-general-info.html

[8] Melitis, C. Folate vs. folic acid – facts about vitamin B. American Pregnancy Association. https://americanpregnancy.org/infertility/folate-vs-folic-acid-what-you-need-to-know/ 

[9] National Institutes of Health. (2020, March 11). Folate. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Folate-HealthProfessional/ 

[10] Lynch, B. L-methylfolate, methylfolate, 5-MTHF, L-5-MTHF. What is the difference?! http://mthfr.net/l-methylfolate-methylfolate-5-mthf/2012/04/05/ 

[11] Stracquadanio, M., Ciotta, L., & Palumbo, M. A. (2018). Effects of myo-inositol, gymnemic acid, and L-methylfolate in polycystic ovary syndrome patients. Gynecological Endocrinology, 34(6), 495-501. DOI: 10.1080/09513590.2017.1418852 

[12] Scaglione, F., & Panzavolta, G. (2014). Folate, folic acid and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate are not the same thing. Xenobiotica, 44(5), 480-488. DOI: 10.3109/00498254.2013.845705 

[13] Obeid, R., Holzgreve, W., & Pietrzik, K. (2013). IS 5-methyltetrahydrofolate an alternative to folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects? Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 41(5), 469-483. DOI: 10.1515/jpm-2012-0256 

[14] Fu, L., Dai, L., Li, X., Zhang, K., & Bai, Y. (2014). Association of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T polymorphism with polycystic ovary syndrome risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis update. European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, 172, 56-61. DOI: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2013.10.001 

[15] Diwaker, A., & Kishore, D. (2018). Evaluation of plasma homocysteine levels in patients of PCOS. The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India, 66(10), 17-20. Retrieved from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31317701/?from_term=pcos+homocysteine&from_pos=1 

[16] Schachter, M., Raziel, A., Friedler, S., Strassburger, D., Bern, O., & Ron-El, R. (2003). Insulin resistance in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome is associated with elevated plasma homocysteine. Human Reproduction, 18(4), 721-727. DOI: 10.1093/humrep/deg190 

[17] Badawy, A., State, O., Sh Abd El Gawad, S., & Abd El Aziz, O. (2007). Plasma homocysteine and polycystic ovary syndrome: the missed link. European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, 131(1), 68-72. DOI: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2006.10.015

 [18] Saadeh, N., Alfaqih, M. A., Mansour, H., Khader, Y. S., Saadeh, R., Al-Dwairi, A., & Nusier, M. (2018). Serum homocysteine is associated with polycystic ovary syndrome in Jordan. Biomedical Reports, 9(5), 439-445. DOI: 10.3892/br.2018.1149 

[19] Linus Pauling Institute. (2017, October). Vitamin D. https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/vitamins/vitamin-D

[20] Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2020, March). Vitamin D. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/vitamin-d/ 

[21] Krul-Poel, Y. H. M., Snackey, C., Louwers, Y., Lips, P., Lambalk, C. B., Laven, J. S. E., & Simsek, S. (2013). The role of vitamin D in metabolic disturbances in polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review. European Journal of Endocrinology, 169(6), 853-865. DOI: 10.1530/EJE-13-0617

[22] Krul-Poel, Y. H. M., Koenders, P. P., Steegers-Theunissen, R. P., Ten Boekel, E., Ter Wee, M. M., Louwers, Y., Lips, P., Laven, J. S. E., & Simsek, S. (2018). Vitamin D and metabolic disturbances in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): a cross-sectional study. PLoS One, 13(12). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0204748 

[23] He, C., Lin, Z., Robb, S. W., & Ezeamama, A. E. (2015). Serum vitamin D levels and polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrients, 7(6), 4555-4577. DOI: 10.3390/nu7064555 [24] Thomson, R. L., Spedding, S., Buckley, J. D. (2012). Vitamin D in the aetiology and management of polycystic ovary syndrome. Clinical Endocrinology, 77(3), 343-350. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2012.04434.x 

[25] Dastorani, M., Aghadavod, E., Mirhosseini, N., Foroozanfard, F., Modarres, S. Z., Siavashani, M. A., & Asemi, Z. (2018). The effects of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic profiles and gene expression of insulin and lipid metabolism in infertile polycystic ovary syndrome candidates for in vitro fertilization. Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, 16(1), 94. DOI: 10.1186/s12958-018-0413-3 

[26] Javed, Z., Papageorgiou, M., Deshmukh, H., Kilpatrick, E. S., Mann, V., Corless, L., Abouda, G., Rigby, A. S., Atkin, S. L., & Sathyapalan, T. (2019). Nutrients, 11(1), 188. DOI: 10.3390/nu11010188 

[27] Kagowska, K., Bajerska, J., & Jamka, M. (2018). The role of vitamin D oral supplementation in insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutrients, 10(11), 1637. DOI: 10.3390/nu10111637

Core essential ingredients

Myo-Inositol

Part of the Vitamin B complex family, Myo-Inositol has been shown to promote female fertility through supporting hormone balance and ovarian function.

D-Chiro Inositol

D-Chiro Inositol balances the metabolic health especially for women with PCOS or insulin sensitivity. Our D-Chiro Inositol (Caronositol®) is a botanical extract purified from carob pods through a solvent-free patented process.

Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol) 

Vitamin D3 is organically produced in the body when the skin is exposed to UVB rays from the sun, which triggers its synthesis. Vitamin D3 can also be obtained from the diet in animal foods (fatty fish, egg yolk).

Folate (as Methylfolate or MTHF) 

MTHF is the predominant, natural and bioactive form of folate, or Vitamin B9. Both the synthetic form (folic acid) and the natural folate form (found in foods) are converted in the body to MTHF.

Customer Reviews

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New look, amazing product!
A
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Seems to help but still not pregnant yet
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